Ukrainian – Health and Culture Resources

Health and Behavioral Health Resources for Ukrainian refugees.

Photo by Tina Hartung (cc license)

Fact Sheets

  • DSHS WA: Ukrainians seeking Refuge in Washington: Frequently Asked Questions, click here
  • HCA WA: Apple Health Eligibility for Individuals from Ukraine, download
  • USCIS.gov: Uniting for Ukraine Vaccine Attestation: English, Ukrainian
  • SNTC: A guide to aid providers about health practices and courtesies to better understand patient expectations. Download the Guide

Psychological first aid webinar (recorded)

Given the recent tragic events in Ukraine, Switchboard hosted a refresher course on Psychological First Aid to aid staff in supporting distressed clients. This webinar was facilitated by Andrew Kritovich, LMHC from the Ukrainian Community Center and Beth Farmer, LCSW from International Rescue Committee. Attendees will increase their awareness of cultural and contextual factors related to Ukraine, as well as learn the fundamentals of Psychological First Aid.
Webinar Recording: https://bit.ly/3D0QBk5
Webinar Slides: https://bit.ly/34LeAH4
Webinar Resources: https://bit.ly/3ihq5sM

National Child Traumatic Stress Network resources

Fostering COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in Russian and Ukrainian Speaking Communities e-course

This free continuing education course is designed to help providers including physicians, nurses, medical assistants, and pharmacists who work with Russian- and Ukrainian-speaking patients better understand vaccine hesitancy within these communities, reasons why community members may be hesitant to receive COVID-19 vaccines and develop strategies to initiate conversations about the COVID-19 vaccine with Russian- and Ukrainian-speaking patients. Click here to access this e-course.

Plain Talk About Childhood Immunizations

Plain Talk About Childhood Immunization includes information on vaccine safety, delaying immunizations, and more. First developed in 1996 in response to requests by parents, health care professionals, school nurses, child care providers and others, this 50-page booklet provides parents with accurate information about immunizations and the diseases they prevent, benefits and risks and vaccine safety and effectiveness. English, Ukrainian, Russian

Center for Adjustment, Resilience and Recovery, International Rescue Committee

  • Coping After Coming to a New Country is a new handout designed for adults and older youth that are resettling in a new country. The material seeks to normalize stress of resettlement and explore coping techniques. English, Ukrainian
  • Helping Children Cope After Coming to a New Country is a new handout designed to empower caregivers in helping their children and youth cope with the stress of resettling to a new country. Available in English, Ukrainian

TB Resources

Measles

sailboat in puget sound waters

Poor Air Quality in Puget Sound: Information and Resource Links

sailboat in puget sound waters
Photo by Michael Li (cc license).

Wildfire smoke can cause a range of health problems including trouble breathing, coughing , headaches, chest pain. 

Children, pregnant women, older adults, those with asthma, heart disease and other chronic illnesses are especially vulnerable to these health impacts.

Precautions to Avoid Negative Health Outcomes 

These include: staying indoors (if possible), limiting outdoor physical activity (such as running, walking, bicycling, sports), closing windows at home, using an indoor air filter, keeping windows closed while driving and wearing a N95 or N100 rated filtration mask (available at hardware home repair stores). 

Smoke from wildfires increases health risks for sensitive groups, including children and babies, especially those who also have asthma or other health conditions.  Pregnant women, people over 65, and those who have heart, lung and other health conditions are also at higher risk.

Please check Puget Sound Clean Air Agency website frequently for updates on air quality. Air quality can change quickly, depending on the wind.

Breathing smoky air can cause a wide range of symptoms from watery eyes and coughing to chest pain and asthma attacks. If you or someone you know is experiencing serious symptoms, contact your healthcare provider, or call 911 if these symptoms become life-threatening. 

Recommendations from Washington State Department of Health

  • Close windows and doors as much as possible. Use fans or an air conditioner (AC) when it is hot, and set your AC to recirculate. If you do not have AC and it is too hot to stay home, go to a place with AC such as a mall, library, or community center in your city.
  • Everyone should stay indoors and avoid strenuous physical activities outside.
  • Keep indoor air clean.  
  • Don’t add to indoor air pollution. Don’t use candles, food boilers, incense, or gas stoves. 
  • Don’t vacuum as vacuuming stirs up additional particles into the air.   
  • Use an air cleaner with a HEPA filter,but do not use an air cleaner that produces ozone.
  • Consider creating your own air purifier with a box fan if you cannot afford an air cleaner.
  • Make sure everyone drinks plenty of water.

Information flyers in 10 languages

Resources for everyone as well as specific information for people who are especially sensitive to smoke (English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Punjabi, Russian, Somali, Tagalog, Ukrainian, Vietnamese) 

Information Flyers in 10 Languages on Air Quality

How People with Health Conditions can Protect Themselves from Wildfire Smoke

English
Spanish Translation
Video highlighting how pregnant women and children can protect themselves from wildfire smoke.

For more Information on Health Effects from Wildfires

Frequently Asked Questions on Smoke from Fires
laughing chinese grandma

Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack in Women

A 1 page PDF with pictures and simple text about the signs and symptoms of heart attack in women. Translations were produced by Franciscan Health System and Hope Heart Institute and are based on an English version produced by the Office on Women's Health.

Available in Chamorro, Chinese, English, Khmer, Korean, Russian, Samoan, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Ukranian and Vietnamese. PDFs in sidebar.

Posted with permission from the Hope Heart Institute.

laughing chinese grandma
Photo by Elizabeth Phung (cc license).