Infant Formula Shortage Resources

Washington State Department of Health Resources

Photo by: Jaye Haych (cc license)

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has compiled the following resources to assist families and caregivers trying to find nutritionally appropriate food for their babies. The below information comes from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Washington WIC program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. For the full news release, please see here.

  • Baby Formula Shortage Partner Toolkit – in English and Spanish, download here.
  • Resources for Families Impacted by the Infant Formula Shortage  in English, Spanish and 14 different languages (FAQs)
  • If you still have concerns about your child’s health, contact your child’s primary care provider’s office and ask to speak with a nurse, medical assistant, or health educator on your child’s care team.
  • For people needing a connection to health care providers, call the Help Me Grow WA hotline at 1-800-322-2588 for referrals and to apply for food and health resources in Washington. Additional support and resources are also available to participants in federal and state nutrition programs.
  • For WIC participants and families, contact your local WIC clinic to get infant formula benefits replaced or change baby formulas. WIC has expanded the types of formula they provide to offer more choices for families participating in the program. They can often tell you which stores have formula in stock. If you can’t reach your local clinic, call the state WIC office at 1-800-841-1410 Monday to Friday, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm. Check the Washington WIC web page for more information on approved replacement infant formulas.
  • For participants in Basic Food (SNAP), visit the Parenthelp123 web page or call 1-800-322-2588.

Some additional tips to help with your infant formula search:

  • Check smaller stores and drug stores or buy online from reputable distributors and pharmacies.
  • Gerber’s MyGerber Baby Expert: reach a certified nutrition or lactation consultant by phone, text, Facebook Messenger, web chat, or video call, who can help you identify a similar formula that may be more readily available
  • Abbott’s Consumer Hotline: call 1-800-986-8540; Abbott’s urgent product request line: ask your OBGYN or your infant’s pediatrician to submit an urgent product request by downloading and completing the form – PDF 
  • Mead Johnson/Reckitt’s Customer Service line: call 1-800 BABY-123 (222-9123)

Community Resources

  • Locate your nearest Community Action Agency (CAA). Your neighborhood CAA may be able to provide you with formula or connect you with local agencies that have formula in stock.
  • United Way’s 2-1-1: dial 2–1-1 to be connected to a community resource specialist affiliated with United Way who may be able to help you identify food pantries and other charitable sources of local infant formula and baby food.
  • Feeding America: call your local food bank to ask whether they have infant formula and other supplies in stock.
  • Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA): certain HMBANA-accredited milk banks are distributing donated breast milk to mothers in need; please note that some may require a prescription from a medical professional. Find an HMBANA-accredited milk bank.
  • Relactation or induced lactation is also possible and can be an alternative to using formula. La Leche League International has resources on how to stimulate milk supply.
Sscreenshot from FIT Instructional Video

FIT Instructional Videos

Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, but it is preventable with screening. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is the most used stool test for colon cancer screening. These videos demonstrate how to properly use a FIT kit to collect a stool sample for colon cancer screening. They are available in Cantonese, English, Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese.

A PDF document containing QR Codes that link directly to each video is provided in the sidebar.

Demonstration: Dr. Rachel Issaka
Videography: Dr. Carey Jackson
Cantonese & Vietnamese Interpreter: Lien T. La
Somali Interpreter: Mohamed Hashi
Spanish Interpreter: Araceli Gonzalez-Medel


Screenshot from video

Live Better with Kidney Disease & Learn About Dialysis

Increasingly, dialysis, a treatment for severe kidney disease, is of concern among Cambodian patients with diabetes. This tool was developed to help educate Cambodian patients and community members about dialysis, also known as renal replacement therapy. It is tailored to reflect common concerns and questions some Cambodians may have when learning about and considering dialysis.

There are two videos (see below and in sidebar), one in Khmer and one in English.

Steering Wheel of Self-Management

In my role as a cultural mediator and diabetes navigator over the last five years, I have recognized the need for simple messaging of abstract concepts for patients from all socio-economic backgrounds in order to be meaningful. There are Western concepts that, as a system, we may take for granted. These include “chronic disease”, “prevention”, and “primary care”. In addition, we have a non-trivial number of illiterate and/or indigenous language speakers that also have low numeracy and a completely different concept of time and scheduled appointments.

The idea behind the “Steering Wheel of Self-Management” is to have a visual tool to be used by providers and patients alike. Providers/ educators can teach patients, patients can teach other patients.

Concept of Self

Perhaps the most basic concept I share with patients is the notion of SELF within the patient-centered care model in a clinical setting. Many of our patients come from countries or health systems that discourage patient participation, questions, or self-empowerment. They come to clinic for a “cure” or “fix” from an educated expert. Once they learn there is no “cure” for a chronic condition like diabetes, they may quickly lose interest or feel that it is not within their rights to express misgivings to a doctor. Hence, I developed the idea of the steering wheel as a central metaphor for illustrating control over one’s chronic disease, instead of being a passive recipient of it.

Prevention: Know how to avoid complications by managing YOUR own personal steering wheel according to YOUR life situations.

Concepts of Journey and Time

For many immigrants and refugees, the concept of a long journey or travel is a familiar one. This implies both distance and time in a way that our patients can more easily connect with.

  • Conceptual Message: TIME, something managed over time
  • Implicit message: Drive your diabetes so it doesn’t drive you

Chronic = continuous: Recognize that your highway and terrain will change over time. Learn to navigate the curves keeping both hands on the your steering wheel.

Steering Wheel Metaphor

Through trial and error during clinical visits and discussions in the lobby, I developed a series of images relating to the one central metaphor that seemed to easily illustrate chronic disease as a tangible concept. Originally I used a stock clip art wheel (later, we developed this original illustration, below) with three spokes to signify the three basic impacts on blood glucose: medication, food and exercise. The two hands on the steering wheel indicating patient empowerment.


  • Steering Wheel of Self-Management, the tool to keep a handle on things (your health).
  • Steering wheel has 3 spokes or points: Exercise, Food, Medicines, all three used in combination,
  • to keep on the road and not drive over the edge or off a cliff.
  • Emphasizing it is not just one thing.

Highway Metaphor

Then over time I began to deepen the metaphor to include the “highway of life” and its curves and roadblocks encountered that can affect diabetes management.

Highway is your diabetes or your health in general, there are many curves and stops on the highway.

Practical Uses

Practical uses of the steering wheel include a version with text and a pictorial-only version for patients with illiteracy or low literacy. The wheel can be printed out and notes written for patients identifying short term goals in the areas of exercise, nutrition and medication management, and for visualizing a care plan. The wheel image can be sent in mailer reminders, as motivator, to patients.

Steering Wheel with Words

Steering Wheel with Spanish words for Exercise, Food, Medicines, and “Driving (Managing) the Course of Your Diabetes”

Steering Wheel – Pictures only

Steering Wheel with images (no words) for Exercise, Food, Medicines

Patient Feedback

Patient feedback has been very positive both in clinic and in community health worker settings. Through the teach-back method, patients have demonstrated a strong grasp of the concept of chronic disease, despite education level. Patients have been able to individualize care plans and select small tangible goals to work on for behavior change.

Copyright

The Steering Wheel of Self-Management operates under the Creative Commons License Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States. You are free to copy, distribute, display this work under the following conditions:

  • Attribution: You must attribute the work to EthnoMed, and author Rose Cano.
  • Noncommercial: You may not use this work for commercial or for-profit purposes
  • Alterations: You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.

For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license of this work. Any of these conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder.

The Brain

Brain Death: What It Means

This handout offers information for families and loved ones of patients. It explains how doctors determine that a person is dead based on their brain function.

Handout PDFs are available at UW Medicine Health Online in English, Arabic, Tigrinya, Russian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Amharic and Spanish languages.

For information for providers, see Determination of Brain Death/Death by Neurologic Criteria – The World Brain Death Project (article accessible with JAMA subscription).

The Brain
Photo by Francisco Bengoa (cc license).
The FITO Museum of Traditional Vietnamese Medicine

Using Traditional Medicines

This handout created by Harborview Medical Center addresses the use of traditional medicines, encouraging patients to discuss them with their doctor and pharmacist. It goes on to explain reasons why this is important.

The handout translated into a number of languages and each PDF includes both target language and English. Languages include: Arabic, Khmer (Cambodian), Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese. Audio narration is also available in each language.

PDFs and audio files are accessible in the sidebar.

These materials were funded by HealthReach.

The FITO Museum of Traditional Vietnamese Medicine
The FITO Museum of Traditional Vietnamese Medicine. Photo by Anthony Tong Lee (cc license).